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10123 - Cloud City


beeblet65
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26 minutes ago, Hole go said:

I di do not think Lego will release those figures. They always make changes or improvements.  These figures are expensive mostly because they are rare, not because they are good.

Pretty much it.  Back in the mid 2000's they were impressive as Boba Fett had printed arms and Pants, but in today's lego market they don't stand up to the newer improved minifigs.

I sold my Boba Fett in April of 2007 for 98 dollars.  That was unheard of for a minifig back then, and the highest priced single minifig ever sold on Ebay at the time (I watched completed sold ebay listings like a hawk).  I thought I made an absolute killing when I sold it, as the previous record for a Boba Fett Sold on Ebay at the time was around 65 dollars.  I remember I sold it to a mom whose child lost his Boba Fett and just couldn't live without that one.

In all honesty, I'm shocked that the new UCS Slave I Boba hasn't killed the resale value on the Cloud City Boba.

 

Edited by Rimmit
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25 minutes ago, Hole go said:

I decided to collect Star Wars minifigures and reluctantly paid about $1k for a new 10123.  I really wanted those figures, but hesitated to buy loose ones or used ones.  There are just so many custom ones out there and I do not want to risk paying a few hundred dollars for some fake ones.  The condition of used ones is hard to tell from pictures and I heard that this set did not age well and many Boba Fett figures may have cracks.  My question is how to protect those figures after the bag is opened.  I do not want to see cracks or discoloration down the road.  My kid keeps bugging me to open the bags and build the set.  Do not know how long he can wait.  I bought a chrome darth Vader in a sealed bag from Amazon a couple weeks ago.  It already has two cracks in the torso even it is sealed.  I returned it, but have not got my money back yet.  

Many printed arm minifigs from this period (Boba, Greedo) had issues with brittle arms - It seems likely that it must have been related to the printing process, or perhaps the printed arms were produced at a separate facility (which might have lacked the proper quality controls). 

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30 minutes ago, Rimmit said:

Pretty much it.  Back in the mid 2000's they were impressive due to the fact they weren't yellow, and Boba Fett had printed arms and Pants, but in today's lego market they don't stand up to the newer improved minifigs.

I can not agree - As I have mentioned before, the classic artistic element of LEGO has unfortunately gotten lost over the years.

The excessive mold/print details on many of today's minifigs are also out of place (since the minifig form itself is extremely simplistic).

In the case of LEGO - More is not always more.

Edited by KShine
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29 minutes ago, KShine said:

Many printed arm minifigs from this period (Boba, Greedo) had issues with brittle arms - It seems likely that it must have been related to the printing process, or perhaps the printed arms were produced at a separate facility (which might have lacked the proper quality controls). 

Thank you for your information.  Any suggestions how to prevent this?  I am thinking about putting them in a case for display only.  But I do not know what kind of case to use.  I have not opened the bags and hope there are no problems.  

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31 minutes ago, KShine said:

I can not agree - As I have mentioned before, the classic artistic element of LEGO has unfortunately gotten lost over the years.

The excessive mold/print details on many of today's minifigs are also out of place (since the minifig form itself is extremely simplistic).

In the case of LEGO - More is not always more.

I actually agree with you completely, however, "traditionalist" lego people are not the one's buying the thousands and thousands of sets.  That does not stop it from being the "improved" product though.  It is the cuter more lovable product, but in terms of taking more effort and precision to make, anything with more detail would be considered "superior" in terms of craftsmanship.  Maybe not artistic value, but from craftsmanship standpoint, more detail is always tougher to do.  It is "superior" in our minds as it is what Lego is to us, but it is not "superior."  Sometimes superior and improved is not always better, as is the case with the newer more detailed minifigs.

While there are many AFOL's, and some sets are definitely geared more for the AFOL, the smaller sets and anything found in Walmart, Target, etc. has a primary audience of children, who really don't care about the more minimalistic appearance. Most kids just want something to play with, and the one's that might even notice the slight increase in detail would think it looks "cool" and not care about the fact it goes against the more traditional appearance. 

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